Slayer’s Farewell Tour

from Loudwire

It was announced earlier this week that Slayer would be taking their final bow as a touring act, but nothing was officially said about albums. It’s well known that guitarist Gary Holt has been compiling ideas for a while, but in a new interview at the 2018 Heavy Metal Hall of History ceremony, Holt gives a definitive “no” on a new Slayer album.

Last summer, we caught up with Slayer frontman Tom Araya. Though he hadn’t been penning new material, he spoke about Holt’s tenacity for getting new ideas on the table. Araya compared Holt to a little kid prodding an adult for attention, feeling out the Slayer guys for when a new album process may start. However, it looks like Slayer won’t be making a 13th studio album.

“No. No, there’s no new album. I’d say it’s a no. But my name is Gary ‘No Comment’ Holt today. I don’t know nothing,” Holt tells The Metal Voice. “You’ve seen the dates, you saw the press releases. And come out and celebrate the mighty history of Slayer, which I’m lucky to have been part of for the last seven years now. It’s been a ride, it’s been remarkable, and we’re gonna end it in gloriously violent fashion.”

As for the next Exodus album, Holt wasn’t shy to hype it up. “I’m taking my time,” he explains. “I’m super proud of it. It’s heavy, of course. It’s crushing. It’s brutal. But it’s something else — it’s something altogether different.”

Slayer’s final North American dates will offer the incredible lineup of Lamb of God, Anthrax, Behemoth and Testament.

The full list of shows was revealed here

Yesterday, Slayer announced they would be embarking on their farewell tour in a video compiling some of the great moments throughout their 30 plus year career. News soon followed that they would be going off in a huge goodbye, taking along with them Lamb of God, Anthrax, Behemoth and Testament for an unmissable tour. Now, the thrash legends have released tour dates, so fans can know where to catch these bands.

The tour kicks off in their home region of Southern California, May 10 in San Diego at the Valley View Casino Center. From there, the tour routes up the coast into Canada, hitting a slew of midwest dates, into the east coast and finally terminating in Texas on June 20. It will be a tour to remember, and these are some pretty huge venues, so you’re not going to want to miss seeing the legends play one final time.

“After 35 years, it’s time to like, collect my pension,” frontman Tom Araya said in an interview from 2016. He spoke about his priorities shifting since he became a family man, although playing live still gave him incredible energy. “I like singing and just spitting that s—t out and convincing everybody that this guy is a f—ing maniac. It’s like acting. You feel the lyrics and you show them with your facial expressions, your body expressions, your intensity — I love that s—t.”

Check out tour dates below.

May 10 – San Diego, Calif. @ Valley View Casino Center
May 11 – Irvine, Calif. @ FivePoint Amphitheatre
May 13 – Sacramento, Calif. @ Papa Murphy’s Park at Cal Expo
May 16 – Vancouver, BC @ PNE Forum
May 17 – Penticton, BC @ South Okanagan Events Centre
May 19 – Calgary, AL @ Big Four
May 20 – Edmonton, AB @ Shaw Centre
May 22 – Winnipeg, MB @ Bell MTS Place
May 24 – Minneapolis, Minn. @ The Armory
May 25 – Chicago, Ill. @ Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre
May 27 – Detroit, Mich. @ Michigan Lottery Amphitheatre @ Freedom Hill
May 29 – Toronto, ON @ Budweiser Stage
May 30 – Montreal, PQ @ Place Bell
June 1 – Uncasville, Conn. @ Mohegan Sun
June 2 – Holmdel, N.J. @ PNC Banks Arts Center
June 4 – Reading, Pa. @ Santander Arena
June 6 – Cincinnati, Ohio @ Riverbend Music Center
June 7 – Cleveland, Ohio @ Blossom Music Center
June 9 – Pittsburgh, Pa. @ KeyBank Pavilion
June 10 – Bristow, Va. @ Jiffy Lube Live
June 12 – Virginia Beach, Va. @ VUHL Amphitheatre
June 14 – Charlotte, N.C. @ PNC Music Pavilion
June 15 – Orlando, Fla. @ Orlando Amphitheatre
June 17 – Houston, Texas @ Smart Financial Center
June 19 – Dallas, Texas @ The Bomb Factory
June 20 – Austin, Texas @ Austin 360 Amphitheatre

Tom Araya with Behemoth (source: Instagram)

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‘Ring of Gold’ by Bathory

The news of the week in the metal world is Slayer’s farewell tour and Gary Holt’s interview where he states that Slayer will not record any new album anymore. I could post the coverage of Slayer’s goodbye events today but just next week we will celebrate Jeff Hanneman’s birthday so there will be a lot of time and space for his band. Meanwhile, let me bring Quorthon back from Valhalla for this Saturday afternoon.

Tom Araya On Jeff Hanneman: ‘I Feel Like I Should Have Done More To Help Him’

On Sunday, July 23, Elliott Fullam of Little Punk People conducted an interview with SLAYER frontman Tom Araya backstage at the Electric Factory in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. You can now watch the chat below. A couple of excerpts follow (transcribed by BLABBERMOUTH.NET).

On when SLAYER will begin recording its next album:

Tom: “I don’t know. When we started doing this… when I started doing this, I always wanted to be in a band and play music. And then I ended up hooking up with four guys that were like-minded, just like me, and we clicked. And then we just started playing and jamming, and then we started writing our own stuff and jamming. Next thing you know, someone says, ‘Hey, I wanna do a song. I wanna do a record.’ And we just kept doing that. Thirty-five years later, I find myself in a place where I never thought I’d ever be. I never really once thought about ever being where I am. And it’s a business. And that was something that I really enjoyed doing because I loved it, and it slowly somehow turned into a business. It wasn’t about making music, [it was about] the business of making music. So what I’m leading into is that we had Jeff [Hanneman, late SLAYER guitarist], who passed away a few years back. We never really had our business matters taken care of, as far as the membership and the band and all that stuff. That’s something that me and Kerry [King, SLAYER guitarist] are, at the moment, in the middle of getting all that squared away. So as far as the next record, apparently we did record a bunch of songs, and we finished the songs for this album, and there was, like, another six or seven songs. We’ll see. [Laughs]”

On whether he ever thinks about Jeff Hanneman when he is onstage playing with SLAYER:

Tom: “Yeah, yeah, because I look over and I see Gary [Holt, SLAYER guitarist] playing, but, yeah, I think about him. Especially when we do songs that me and him co-wrote. Me and him were collaborators — we wrote a lot of songs together, me and Jeff. So there’s a lot of songs that we play where it’s, like… And then this new album [2015’s ‘Repentless’], it was kind of a collaboration between me and Kerry, but not. [Laughs] That’s a clue. [Laughs] That’s a clue right there; I just gave you a big clue. But, yeah, I think about him a lot. Especially when we do… ’cause we always end our set with ‘Angel Of Death’, and that’s a tribute to him. So, yeah, I think about him. You just wonder… You always think about how you wish you could have or should have done things different that went on towards the latter period of his life. In hindsight, you always wanna do… you think you should have done more, and that’s how I feel: I feel like we could have, or I should have done more to help him.”

Araya told Guitar World magazine in a 2015 interview that Jeff hadn’t been involved in any discussions about making a new studio album prior to his passing. “Jeff kind of … [pauses to think] He was a hard person to talk to,” Tom said. “When he disappeared, he wouldn’t answer calls or return texts. I would reach out to him at points, like, ‘Dude, are you ever gonna respond to anything just to let me know you’re alive?’ And he eventually would. At one point, we had a conversation dealing with the issue of Dave [Lombardo, drums] leaving, and Jeff said he had worked out an idea for a song. And he sent that out to everybody. So he was working on stuff, but I think the main thing was really his ability to perform. It was his strumming hand, which was an important thing in the music we play, and that got to him. We kept telling him to practice, like, ‘It’ll get better! You might have some difficulties, but it’ll get better.’ We tried to encourage him to keep playing music.”

Added King: “From, like, seven months after [Jeff] got hurt, we had him come to rehearsal before every tour, trying to get him back in. He was trying, but he just wasn’t there. The hardest thing I ever had to say was, ‘You’re not ready.’ That dude’s been my sidekick for twenty-five years, and I have to tell him he can’t go on tour in the band he’s been in all his life. That sucked.”

Asked if Jeff was hurt by that, Kerry said: “I don’t know. That’s tough. My whole thing was Gary‘s been out with us, for however long it was at that point, and he’s fucking spot-on money. I said to Jeff, ‘As much as people are gonna see you up there and not grasp, or forget, that maybe the playing is not perfect, I don’t want that on YouTube for you to live with for the rest of your life.’ You have to think about stupid shit like that now. But that was tough. We kept trying to get him in and it wasn’t coming around. If he hadn’t passed, I don’t know if he ever would have been good enough to just step back into being Jeff Hanneman again.”

Holt, who is still a member of San Francisco Bay Area thrash icons EXODUS, has been the touring guitarist for SLAYER since January 2011 when Hanneman, contracted necrotizing fasciitis, also known as flesh-eating disease, from a spider bite in his backyard. The infection ravaged the flesh and tissues of Hanneman‘s arm, leading to numerous surgeries, skin grafts and intense periods of rehab that forced him into semi-retirement and left him near death at several points.

Hanneman eventually died in May 2013 from alcohol-related cirrhosis of the liver. He is credited for writing many of SLAYER‘s classic songs, including “Angel Of Death” and “South Of Heaven”.

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12-year old Elliott Fullam of Little Punk People hung out with SLAYER frontman Tom Araya backstage at their show at the Electric Factory in Philadelphia yesterday (Sunday, July 23rd). You can watch the whole interview below.

In this candid interview, Tom talks about how he misses late guitarist Jeff Hanneman and wishes he could have done more for him in his last years. He also discusses the possibility of their next record, humanity, the Repentless comic and how he believes that the world isn’t going to get any better, bringing an inevitable apocalypse.

On whether he ever thinks about Jeff Hanneman when he is onstage playing with SLAYER, Tom replied:

Tom: “Yeah, yeah, because I look over and I see Gary [HoltSLAYER guitarist] playing, but, yeah, I think about him. Especially when we do songs that me and him co-wrote. Me and him were collaborators — we wrote a lot of songs together, me and Jeff. So there’s a lot of songs that we play where it’s, like… And then this new album [2015’s ‘Repentless’], it was kind of a collaboration between me and Kerry, but not. [Laughs] That’s a clue. [Laughs] That’s a clue right there; I just gave you a big clue. But, yeah, I think about him a lot. Especially when we do… ’cause we always end our set with ‘Angel Of Death’, and that’s a tribute to him. So, yeah, I think about him. You just wonder… You always think about how you wish you could have or should have done things different that went on towards the latter period of his life. In hindsight, you always wanna do… you think you should have done more, and that’s how I feel: I feel like we could have, or I should have done more to help him.”

In September 2015, SLAYER released “Repentless“, the band’s 12th studio album, the first without Jeff Hanneman and first with producer Terry Date, to widespread rave reviews and the highest chart debut of the band’s career. The band also teamed up with director BJ McDonnell for three high-concept and brutal music videos for the album’s “Repentless“, then for “You Against You,” and the most recent, “Pride in Prejudice“.

source: Blabbermouth and Metal Addicts

The original video